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The Joy of Jasmine

August 7, 2011

When Potter, my canine shadow for many years, passed away – just a month after my oldest left for college – the emptiness was unbearable. I honestly didn’t want to relive that, ever. So when the rest of my family started pushing for another dog back in September, I was less than enthusiastic.

I’d heard all of it before  too – how everyone would chip in and help.  Sure. I did everything with Potter, until the end. That’s when my husband really stepped up and handled what I couldn’t.

But now my commute is longer. I travel more. I really can’t maintain the same level of commitment.  Seriously, if everyone else also takes care of this dog, well then, maybe.

I rode with my 19-year-old son to EZ Brook Farm in Nottingham, Pennsylvania, just to look.  He and my husband researched the kennel, compiled all the facts. I was surprised when we arrived. It was immaculately clean, the dogs were well behaved and the breeder was very nice.  But seeing my giggling six-year-old with 20 little German Shepherd puppies rolling and jumping all over her was irresistible  – absolutely adorable.  I was in.

Jasmine rode home on my lap.  As I stroked her fur and held her, I was entranced. I was in love with this dog.  I really didn’t remember how soft and sweet puppies were and how they melt your heart.

Jasmine turned a year old this week and today weighs 85 pounds. I can’t lift her anymore, but it doesn’t stop her from putting her head and half of her body on my lap (which I love).

The whole family went through basic obedience training when she was six months, and she listens most of the time (just like the rest of us). She was super easy to housebreak, sleeps til 7:30 a.m. and barks to be let out.  She’s wicked smart, beautiful and loyal.

Jasmine isn’t perfect though.  She still loves to chew. She devoured our aging living room furniture within the first three months. She’ll now “release” stuffed animals and containers she knows she’s not supposed to latch on to, but it still doesn’t stop her from trying.

And she’s stronger than she knows. I can attest. One morning I wasn’t paying attention and was literally dragged through the front yard in hot pursuit of a squirrel.

And the dog hair, agh, even with brushing and “furminator” treatments, its twice daily vacuuming.

But you know what? Jasmine is worth it.  She’s my dog and I love her. I like being close to her and knowing where she is. She seems to feel the same about me. Being outside tossing the Frisbee to her, seeing her run and grab it, and hoping she’ll decide to bring it back (we’re still working on that) is one of my favorite past-times.

I seem to have tremendous acceptance and boundless forgiveness for this amazing and amusing creature.  And she affects me and I believe I affect her. I like who I am when I’m with her. For me, that’s real joy… the joy of Jasmine.

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3 Comments leave one →
  1. August 8, 2011 9:46 pm

    I actually just wrote a blog entry about losing my dog best friend…so sad. Then I got a dog who is around your dogs age, and I don’t regret it either! I am happy you have the joy of having another dog in the family 🙂

    • July 3, 2012 3:53 pm

      She’s a real treat, and I’ve seen your new companion. So adorable! Thanks much for the post. Looking forward to reading more of yours as well.

  2. June 21, 2014 8:19 am

    Bailey, Jasmine is gorgeous! And I can tell that she is “wicked smart” – you can see it in her eyes. I can also see that she brings your family lots of joy – and you’re the apple of her eye. 🙂 ~Terri

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